Breaking News

Important Travel medicine tips for your journey While travelling to other countries, it is important

image for reference only
Important Travel medicine tips for your journey While travelling to other countries, it is important to keep some vital Travel medicine handy. Preparing a comprehensive first-aid kit can be of great help at times of emergencies. You first-aid kit should include the following medicines and accessories. The first thing to add to your first-aid kit is your prescription medicines and that too in their original containers. Stomach related issues are common during journeys. Hence, you should include medicines for upset stomach and diarrhea. It would be helpful to take an antibiotic prescription for diarrhea from your doctor. Before travelling you must always seek out professional travel advice to ensure your families and your own safety.

Other important Travel medicine includes loperamide, bismuth subsalicylate and antacids. Since cold and cough are easy to catch and commonly associated with travelling, you should get a prescription from your doctor. Pain relievers like acetaminophen, aspirin, naproxen, ibuprofen and ketoprofen are great help in case of headaches, injuries and bruises or other complications. Anti allergens like antihistamines and decongestants that do not cause drowsiness are also good options for taking in your journey. If you are travelling in a large pack, you may not be aware of the different travelling ailments that your friends or relatives may be suffering from. Hence, it would be helpful to take along motion sickness medicines like dimenhyddrinate, acetazolamide and promethazine that also help in fighting altitude sickness and nausea.

The increasing affordability of air travel has enabled more people to travel to worldwide destinations, whether it is to visit family and friends, for religious reasons, for business trips or for holidays. The world has effectively opened up and travel to exotic destinations such as Asia, India, Africa and South America is commonplace. Not only that, many people are now heading 'off the beaten track' to see wonderful sights in more remote areas, and teenagers often undertake 'gap year' travel, backpacking through many developing countries. However because of the 'normality' now associated with travelling to developing countries, many have become blasé about the associated health risks.

Just a decade ago most of us booked our holidays through a High Street Travel Agent, who would often give advice about travel health as part of the service. Many of these travel agents still do give advice, as evidenced by the study summarised above. However, many travellers these days make their own travel arrangements, either via 'online' travel agents, or totally independently, and therefore are not offered overt advice about travel health requirements. As a result, many travellers realise the need for vaccinations and anti-malarials too late, and find it difficult to complete preventive vaccination schedules, and some don't realise them at all, departing on their travels unprotected.

Firstly, it is important to budget for travel vaccinations right at the outset when you are booking your travel, as some are not cheap, and the cost can come as rather a surprise if unprepared. Researching what is needed for the destination at the beginning will enable you to estimate the costs for all involved in your travelling group. A number of people go to or are referred to their local Travel Clinic for advice, because they have left it too late to get timely appointments with their GP, because they are travelling to several countries and have complex health planning requirements, or because they know they can all get the advice, vaccinations and anti-malarials from one place.

No comments